A step-by-step tutorial for making Homemade Chicken Broth including instructions for the stovetop OR instant pot.  You won’t believe how easy it is to make your own broth!
Looking for leftover chicken recipes?  Some of my favorite leftover chicken recipes include Baked Creamy Chicken Taquitos, and Creamy Chicken and Wild Rice Soup.

Whenever we go to Costco I like to buy one of their nice, big Rotisserie chicken for $4.99.  I can usually get 4-5 meals of this one rotisserie chicken, plus, I can use it to make a large batch of chicken broth.

WHY Make Homemade Broth?

  1. EASY– Once you make it, you’ll understand just how easy it is!
  2. Delicious– homemade broth takes ANY recipe over top top in terms of depth of flavor
  3. Peace of mine– I love knowing exactly what went in to this recipe and I love getting the most of my money.

How to Make Homemade Chicken Broth:

1. Remove the meat.  remove all of the meat from the rotisserie chicken; the dark and white meat. Place it in a covered container, in the fridge, to add to the soup later.  (See tips on cutting a rotisserie chicken, turkey, or other bird below the recipe card).

At this point you can discard the carcus/bones or you can use them to make delicious homemade chicken broth.

On the stovetop:

2. Add to large pot: Place the entire remaining chicken carcass (bones and skin) into a large stockpot.  Add carrots, celery, onion, bay leaves, peppercorns, rosemary, thyme and water to the pot.

3. Boil and simmer.  Slowly bring the mixture to a boil, skimming off any foam as it rises to the surface. Reduce heat to low, cover and simmer on low for 2-4 hours.

4. Strain.  Strain the broth through a fine sieve strainer, discarding bones, vegetables and seasonings so that you are only left with the clear smooth broth. Stir in chicken bullion.

5. Store or use.  Decide to use what’s in your pot to make homemade chicken noodle soup or store the broth in the refrigerator.

In the Instant Pot:

2. Add to Instant Pot: Place the entire remaining chicken carcass (bones and skin), carrots, celery, onion, bay leaves, peppercorns, rosemary, thyme and water into the pot.

3. Cook.  Cook on high pressure for 30 minutes.

4. Strain.  Strain the broth through a fine sieve strainer, discarding bones, vegetables and seasonings so that you are only left with the clear smooth broth. Stir in chicken bullion.

5. Store or use.  Decide to use what’s in your pot to make homemade chicken noodle soup or store the broth in the refrigerator.

STORING AND FREEZING INSTRUCTIONS:

  1. To store:  Refrigerate the broth overnight, for use the next day. After refrigerating, skim the fat that has raised to the surface.
  2. To freeze: I like to measure out my broth in batches of two cups each.  I place each bath in ziplock bags and put them in the freezer.  This way, when I pull it out of the freezer, I know I have exactly 2 cups of homemade chicken broth for whatever recipe I’m making!

Use chicken and chicken broth in these recipes:

 

A pot filled with veggies and a chicken carcus to make homemade chicken broth.

A measuring cup filled with chicken broth and two plastic bags with chicken broth.

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Recipe

Prep 15 mins
Cook 2 hrs
Total 2 hrs 15 mins
Add to Meal Plan

Ingredients
 
 

  • 1 rotisserie chicken (just the leftover pieces and bones)
  • 2 ribs celery , with leaves and cut into chunks
  • 2 medium carrots , cut into chunks
  • 2 medium onions , cut into chunks
  • 2 bay leaves
  • 1/2 teaspoon dried rosemary
  • 1/2 teaspoon dried thyme
  • 10 whole peppercorns
  • 6-8 cups cold water
  • 6 teaspoons chicken bouillon paste , or bouillon cubes

Instructions
 

  • Place rotisserie chicken, vegetables, spices and water into a large soup pot. 
  • Slowly bring to a boil over medium heat. Skim off any foam that rises to the surface.  
  • Reduce heat, cover and simmer on low heat for at least 1-2 hours.
  • Remove from heat and allow to cool. 
  • Strain broth through a fine sieve strainer, discarding all vegetables and seasonings so you are only left with the broth. Season with chicken boullion paste to taste. 
  • At this point I like to pour the broth into my soup pot and refrigerate it for a few hours so that the fat from the broth will rise to the top and I can skim it off.

Notes

To Store: Refrigerate the broth overnight for use the next day. After refrigerating, skim the fat off that has raised to the surface.
To Freeze: Measure out the chicken bone broth in batches of two cups each. Place each batch into freezer safe bags and place in freezer. This way, when you pull one out, you know there is exactly 2 cups of homemade chicken broth!
Instant Pot Chicken Broth:
    • Place remaining chicken carcass (bones and skin), carrots, celery, onion, bay leaves, peppercorns, rosemary, thyme, and water into Instant Pot.
    • Cook on high pressure for 30 minutes.
    • Strain broth through fine strainer, discarding bones, vegetables, and seasonings so you are only left with a clear, smooth broth. Stir in chicken bouillon. Store in refrigerator or use to make homemade chicken noodle soup!

Nutrition

Calories: 178kcalCarbohydrates: 41gProtein: 5gFat: 1gSodium: 234mgPotassium: 1052mgFiber: 10gSugar: 16gVitamin A: 20795IUVitamin C: 26mgCalcium: 212mgIron: 2.4mg

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How to cut a rotisserie chicken:

Cutting your rotisserie chicken the right way will allow you to get the most meat from your rotisserie chicken. Follow the steps below.

  1. Cut the twine off the legs. Remove the twine that ties the legs together and place your chicken on a cutting board.
  2. Remove the legs. Pull one leg slightly away from the body and carefully slice through the leg meat and skin.  Then, pull the leg away from the body and when the hip bone pops up, place your sharp knife between the hip bone and the rest of the body and cut to remove it.  Repeat these steps with the other leg.
  3. Separate the drumstick and thigh. Place your knife on the natural line that separates the drumstick and the thigh.  Cut through this joint, separating the two pieces. Repeat with the other leg.
  4. Remove the breast meat. Carve along one side of the breast bone to remove one side of breast meat.  Place your knife along the natural line that separates the two breasts of the chicken and cut from front to back while pulling the breast meat away from the bone.  Remove all the breast meat from the chicken.
  5. Slice.  Slice the breast meat into portions by laying it skin side up and cutting it into thin portions.

Have you tried this recipe?!

RATE and COMMENT below! I would love to hear your experience.

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Lauren Allen

Welcome! I’m Lauren, a mom of four and lover of good food. Here you’ll find easy recipes and weeknight meal ideas made with real ingredients, with step-by-step photos and videos.

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Comments

  1. I’ve been doing this for years! except I make really large batches. I freeze the carcasses until I have 3 or 4, then on cleaning day throw about double your ingredients with the carcasses and let it simmer 4-8 hours. After straining, I’ll divide it into 2 equal portions. One, I’ll divide into 1 cup portions and freeze in bags or containers. The second portion, I simmer in saucepan until reduced by at least half, until it is thicker and very hearty in flavor. This I freeze in ice cube trays to use in saute’s, pastas etc.. Where you want rich flavor with little liquid. Great minds think alike !

    1. Dump the skin after the broth. It adds a lot of flavor. The fats skim off when it cools, but the flavor remains.

  2. Great stock idea, similar to what I do for soup. Difference is I have teenagers. We buy two Costco chickens and have just about enough leftovers for Pancit or small amount of chicken salad. I usually use the carcass for chicken noodle soup, but this gives more options for the stock to be used in other dishes.

    1. Hi Carol, the label is an estimate of the entire broth recipe. The actual amounts will very greatly depending on the size of chicken, how much meat was left on the carcass, whether or not you skimmed any of the fat off, etc.

  3. 5 stars
    Excellent!! This is my go to broth recipe now. I have made it several times now and it turns out so tasty. I use this along with the Chicken Noodle Soup recipe, and that is also a favorite!

  4. I like your bone broth recipe which I need to try one day. My knife skills aren’t the best, so I usually buy Kettle and Fire’s chicken and beef bone broths, which can be a bit pricey.

  5. 5 stars
    Your recipes are so wonderful. Thank you so much for sharing with everyone. We have absolutely loved all that we have tried. Look forward to hearing from you soon.

  6. Thanks for your leftover chicken recipes! I usually eat the parts I like and throw the rest away. I always wonder if there are any not so good ingredients in those rotisserie chickens. I look forward to trying all of these ideas including the chicken broth recipe. I usually stud one of my onions with cloves and often throw in a few spices that I’m in the mood for. Be careful of using some of the bouillon and other flavor enhancers. They tend to have MSG and other undesirable ingredients. If you have a clean brand that you use, I’d love to know about it!

    1. Msg has been proven to be safe. The whole msg scare was a made up controversy that people accepted and promoted without any research.

  7. Why do you need to add chicken bouillon at the end? Isn’t that what the recipe makes?
    Genuinely interested 🙂

  8. I made the chicken broth last night and put it in the fridge overnight. This morning, it’s a jelly-like texture. Is that normal, or should it be liquid?

    1. The jelly-like texture is due to the collagen extracted from the bones. That is super healthy!

      It’s good to know that this recipe does extract the collagen; I thought you needed to add an acid like apple cider vinegar to the cooking process to do so. I’ll have to try this now 🙂