With just four ingredients this Marshmallow Fondant is inexpensive, and easy to make and use for any creative cake decorating project! It’s a bonus that it tastes good too!
Looking for a cake recipe to decorate with fondant?  Keep it simple with a homemade Yellow or Chocolate cake or make it fancy and fill your cake with chocolate mousse!

Marshmallow fondant draped over a cake.

What I love about this recipe:

  • Inexpensive: store-bought fondant can be pretty expensive but this marshmallow fondant only costs about $2 for per batch (about 3lbs of fondant)!
  • Fast: it only takes about 10 minutes to made homemade fondant!
  • Perfect smooth, pliable texture for cake decorating!

How to make marshmallow fondant:

1. Microwave marshmallows and water.

2. Mix in powdered sugar.  Grease your hands with shortening and use your hands to mix in powdered sugar with the melted marshmallow mixture.

3. Knead: Grease your hands and your counter-top generously with shortening. Turn marshmallow mixture onto counter and start kneading it like you would dough. Add more powdered sugar as needed and re-grease your hands and the counter-top as needed until the dough is smooth and soft.

Four process photos for making marshmallow fondant.

4. Add color (if desired) and roll it out: Roll it out thinly (about ⅛ inch thick) for covering cakes or creating decorations.

Three process photos for rolling out fondant and draping over a cake.

To color fondant:

Add a little icing color to your desired amount of fondant.  Knead the fondant with your hands until it absorbs all of the color (I recommend wearing plastic gloves). Add more color as needed to reach the desired hue.

To store fondant:

Coat fondant with a thin layer of shortening, wrap it tightly with plastic wrap, and the place it in a resealable bag with all the air squeezed out. It will keep well in refrigerator for up to 2 months.

How much Fondant do I need to cover my cake? 

This recipe makes about 3 pounds (48 oz) of fondant. Here is a conversion chart to help you determine how much fondant you need to cover your cake.

A small cake covered with white marshmallow fondant and a flower on top.

Adaptations and Variations:

  • Stovetop instead of microwave:  Add water and marshmallows to a small saucepan over medium heat. Stir well until melted. Remove from heat and stir in powdered sugar.
  • Substitute large marshmallow:  To substitute large marshmallows, use a 16 oz. bag of large marshmallows.  Follow directions exactly, using a little more water and/or powdered sugar in step 6 to find the right consistency for a smooth dough.
  • To use a stand mixer:  If you don’t want to knead the dough with your hands, you can use a stand mixer with a dough hook.  Be sure to FIRST grease the bowl and the hook with shortening.  Then dust the bowl gently with powdered sugar.  Add marshmallows and slowly add the rest of the powdered sugar (about ½ cup at a time), mixing between each addition.

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Recipe

A small cake covered with white marshmallow fondant and a flower on top.
Prep 15 mins
Cook 5 mins
Total 20 mins

Ingredients
  

  • 16 ounce package mini marshmallows (8 ½ cups)
  • 2-5 Tablespoons water
  • 8 cups powdered sugar
  • 1/3 cup vegetable shortening

Instructions
 

  • Place marshmallows and 2 tablespoons of water in a large microwave-safe bowl. 
  • Microwave for 30 seconds on high; stir until mixed well. Continue microwaving in 30 second intervals until melted and smooth.
  • Place about 5 cups of the powdered sugar on top of the melted marshmallow mixture and gently fold it into the marshmallows.
  • Grease your hands and your counter generously with shortening. Turn marshmallow mixture onto counter and start kneading it like you would dough. 
  • Add more confectioners' sugar as needed and re-grease your hands and the counter as needed.
  • If the marshmallow fondant is tearing easily, it is too dry; add water (about ½ tablespoon at a time) kneading it until fondant forms a firm, smooth elastic ball that will stretch without tearing.

Notes

Yield: This recipe makes about 3 pounds (48 oz) of fondant. Here is a conversion chart to help you determine how much fondant you need to cover your cake.
Storing Instructions: To store the fondant, coat it with a thin layer of shortening, wrap it tightly with plastic wrap, and the place in a resealable bag with all the air squeezed out. It will keep well in refrigerator for up to 2 months.
How to color fondant: To color marshmallow fondant, add a little icing color to your desired amount of fondant. Knead the fondant with your hands until it absorbs all of the color (I recommend using plastic gloves). Add more color as needed to reach desired hue.
Adaptations and Variations:
  • Stovetop instead of microwave:  Add water and marshmallows to a small saucepan over medium heat. Stir well until melted. Remove from heat and stir in powdered sugar.
  • Substitute large marshmallow:  To substitute large marshmallows, use a 16 oz. bag of large marshmallows.  Follow directions exactly, using a little more water and/or powdered sugar in step 6 to find the right consistency for a smooth dough.
  • To use stand mixer:  If you don't want to knead the dough with your hands, you can use a stand mixer with a dough hook.  Be sure to FIRST grease the bowl and the hook with shortening.  Then dust the bowl gently with powdered sugar.  Add marshmallows and slowly add the rest of the powdered sugar (about ½ cup at a time), mixing between each addition.

Nutrition

Calories: 2890kcalCarbohydrates: 663gProtein: 4gFat: 34gSaturated Fat: 8gSodium: 193mgSugar: 600gCalcium: 7mgIron: 0.8mg

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Have you tried this recipe?!

RATE and COMMENT below! I would love to hear your experience.

*I originally shared this recipe December 2013. Updated April 2020 with process photos and more detailed instructions. 

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Lauren Allen

Welcome! I’m Lauren, a mom of four and lover of good food. Here you’ll find easy recipes and weeknight meal ideas made with real ingredients, with step-by-step photos and videos.

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  1. I made a cake for my granddaughter’s first birthday last year, I worked with the sugar geek show marshmallow fondant and it’s wonderful except, it taste terrible as there is still fondant required! Now I am making her second birthday cake as I write and the cake I am so wanting to make calls for a fondant type covering but my family does not want to peel their frosting off their cake and i can’t say I blame them. I then saw a buttercream that can be molded but it calls for to much cornstarch and even the creator said , taste? well….. So I am going to try yours but because I still have SOOO much to do, if you see this and want to tell us anything about the taste I should know about, “please do”.
    I mostly need to cover the three tier square pans , for a fondant covering of the bases. I would love to mold with it but have other terrible tasting stuff and then will pipe with butter cream. Doing a mold to make it look like Spirit the horse, with a three tier of blue sky, green grass (That’s the need for fondant) and them molds and piping of branches, cherry blossoms (mostly on top for the horse) and grass, wild flowers rocks, forest animals , water and clouds. If this fondant works I am going to TELL THE WORLD! especially lol if I can mold with it instead of this other horrible stuff, (nothing against sugar geek she’s amazing) But really, no one can make truly edible fondant? I hope if works (prayers are welcomed?)

    Sincerely Momio (grandma) reaching out

    1. So, not for covering the cake, but for small molded pieces, have you tried candy clay (modeling chocolate)? You can make it from almond bark, candy melts or white almond bark and color it with gel color – it works quite well. It gets pretty firm for sculpted pieces…maybe I misunderstood your question, but if not, I’ve used it several times, and my kids live the taste. I have also used marshmallow fondant to cover a cake, and it does taste better, fyi.

  2. I’m making a fresh strawberry cake for my granddaughter’s b’day. Can I place this fondant on top of iced cake, or should it be placed directly onto cake sans icing?

    1. It just depends how thick/sturdy the frosting is. Did you use fresh or freeze dried strawberries for your cake frosting? Fresh strawberries will result in a runnier frosting and I don’t think the fondant will stay put very well. If it’s a thicker, sturdier buttercream, then yes, that would be fine.

  3. Hey, I’m looking at the ingredient measurements and wondering if they’re written out correctly? It says 16 oz package of marshmallows (8 1/2 cups) but 16 oz is 2 cups. Then for the powdered sugar it says 8 cups – is that correct or is it supposed to be like 1 1/2 – 2 cups?

    1. The amounts of correct! 16 oz of marshmallows is 8 1/2 cups of marshmallows. The 8 oz= 1 cup is for liquids. Hope you enjoy the Fondant.

  4. Do you need to add all the powdered sugar? or do you just add until you get the proper consistency. I made this again recently and used all the sugar but then had to add more water. i’m wondering if I should have just stopped adding sugar when it seemed right?

  5. Hi, i am planning to try this recipe for fondant but i only need to make enough to make the shape “1 D” and a few heart shaped cut outs to decorate an 8″ cake. How much fondant will I need and how do I alter the recipe?
    Thanks!

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